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Brazil Cerrado

Cerrado is a region in the state of Minas Gerais, the largest coffee-producing state in Brazil. Coffee has been a major crop in this region since the 1980’s mainly because of the devastating black frost of 1975 that forced growers from the Parana region to relocate north to Cerrado and other areas of Minas Gerais. Today, coffee is produced by over 4,500 growers on 175,000 hectares of farmland with yields of approximately 5.5 to 6.0 million bags per year. The coffee is grown in rich soil that the natives call “Terra Roxa” or “Red Earth” and other factors such as consistent rains, high daytime temperatures, and dry winters combine to make the Cerrado region ideal for producing coffee.

Brazil Cerrado

Cerrado is a region in the state of Minas Gerais, the largest coffee-producing state in Brazil. Coffee has been a major crop in this region since the 1980’s mainly because of the devastating black frost of 1975 that forced growers from the Parana region to relocate north to Cerrado and other areas of Minas Gerais. Today, coffee is produced by over 4,500 growers on 175,000 hectares of farmland with yields of approximately 5.5 to 6.0 million bags per year. The coffee is grown in rich soil that the natives call “Terra Roxa” or “Red Earth” and other factors such as consistent rains, high daytime temperatures, and dry winters combine to make the Cerrado region ideal for producing coffee.

Brazil Mogiana

On July 11, 1985 the Cooperativa de Cafeicultores e Agropecuaristas (COCAPEC) was founded. COCAPEC began with almost 300 members in its first year of operations, and today it has grown to over 2,000 members. COCAPEC is renowned in this coffee-growing region for its technical support and natural drying methods. The cooperative’s technical department works in partnership with its members to guarantee consistent coffee quality. Currently, the high Mogiana region has an average annual production of more than one million bags of coffee, of which 85% is high quality beans produced at an optimal altitude and temperature. Our current offering is Fine Cup (FC) and Strictly Soft (SS), the highest cup category in the Brazilian coffee grading.

Brazil Mogiana

On July 11, 1985 the Cooperativa de Cafeicultores e Agropecuaristas (COCAPEC) was founded. COCAPEC began with almost 300 members in its first year of operations, and today it has grown to over 2,000 members. COCAPEC is renowned in this coffee-growing region for its technical support and natural drying methods. The cooperative’s technical department works in partnership with its members to guarantee consistent coffee quality. Currently, the high Mogiana region has an average annual production of more than one million bags of coffee, of which 85% is high quality beans produced at an optimal altitude and temperature. Our current offering is Fine Cup (FC) and Strictly Soft (SS), the highest cup category in the Brazilian coffee grading.

CoffeeClub

Each month we select three unique and highly graded coffees from around the world. We will roast and ship them directly to you. 

CoffeeClub+

  • Each month we select four premium seasonal coffee assortments
  • Your package comes with 1 lb of each single-origin bean

Colombia Decaf

Colombia MC Decaf comes from small family-owned farms in the Colombian “coffee triangle.” The main harvest is between October and January, and the “mitaca” harvest is between April and June. Small coffee producers pick and process their coffee at their own micro-wet mills and then dry their own coffee, typically on elevated tables inside solar dryers that provide protection from the rain

Colombia Decaf

Colombia MC Decaf comes from small family-owned farms in the Colombian “coffee triangle.” The main harvest is between October and January, and the “mitaca” harvest is between April and June. Small coffee producers pick and process their coffee at their own micro-wet mills and then dry their own coffee, typically on elevated tables inside solar dryers that provide protection from the rain

Colombia Excelso

Colombia Excelso comes from small family-owned farms in the Colombian “coffee triangle.” The main harvest is between October and January, and the “mitaca” harvest is between April and June. Small coffee producers pick and process their coffee at their own micro-wet mills and then dry their own coffee, typically on elevated tables inside solar dryers that provide protection from the rain.

Colombia Excelso

Colombia Excelso comes from small family-owned farms in the Colombian “coffee triangle.” The main harvest is between October and January, and the “mitaca” harvest is between April and June. Small coffee producers pick and process their coffee at their own micro-wet mills and then dry their own coffee, typically on elevated tables inside solar dryers that provide protection from the rain.

Colombia Supremo

Colombia Supremo 17/18 is sourced from small- to medium-sized family-owned farms located within the city of Pereira in the department of Risaralda, Colombia. Coffee is cultivated on farms that average about 2.5 hectares in size. Producers pick and process coffee at their own micro-wet mills and then dry their own coffee, typically on elevated tables inside solar dryers that provide protection from the nearly continuous rainy season.

Colombia Supremo

Colombia Supremo 17/18 is sourced from small- to medium-sized family-owned farms located within the city of Pereira in the department of Risaralda, Colombia. Coffee is cultivated on farms that average about 2.5 hectares in size. Producers pick and process coffee at their own micro-wet mills and then dry their own coffee, typically on elevated tables inside solar dryers that provide protection from the nearly continuous rainy season.

El Salvador La Esperanza

After over 100 years of experience, love and pride in coffee growing, the descendants of the Magaña-Menendez family have been at the forefront of quality and control handling. This, coupled with their struggle for sustainability and social function have been the main ingredients for their high quality coffee. As a member of Rainforest Alliance, La Esperanza and the Magaña-Menendez family take great care in growing all while taking the right steps to better preserve the ecosystem in which their coffee grows.

El Salvador La Esperanza

After over 100 years of experience, love and pride in coffee growing, the descendants of the Magaña-Menendez family have been at the forefront of quality and control handling. This, coupled with their struggle for sustainability and social function have been the main ingredients for their high quality coffee. As a member of Rainforest Alliance, La Esperanza and the Magaña-Menendez family take great care in growing all while taking the right steps to better preserve the ecosystem in which their coffee grows.

El Salvador Santa Ana

This coffee comes from the famed producers of Finca Malacara. Finca Malacara dates back to 1888 when the Alvarez family inherited the land and started planting coffee. The farm has since grown from it's original size, now producing more coffee outside of the Malacara name. Over 4 generations have been apart of the farm and counting. The farms are located near the Santa Ana Volcano in the Apaneca Lamatepec coffee region, which is recognized as the "Gold Coffee Belt" of El Salvador.

El Salvador Santa Ana

This coffee comes from the famed producers of Finca Malacara. Finca Malacara dates back to 1888 when the Alvarez family inherited the land and started planting coffee. The farm has since grown from it's original size, now producing more coffee outside of the Malacara name. Over 4 generations have been apart of the farm and counting. The farms are located near the Santa Ana Volcano in the Apaneca Lamatepec coffee region, which is recognized as the "Gold Coffee Belt" of El Salvador.

Espresso

Our wll known and adored Espresso. This is a blend of several premium coffees including an India Cherry Rubusto to give is a perfect crème.

Ethiopia Natural Sidamo

Guji is one of the zones of the Oromia Region of Southern Ethiopia known for producing some amazing natural coffees. This coffee tends to showcase some nice fruit-forward characteristics with a medium body. In the past, coffees from Guji had been sold in the Sidamo category, but since the quality is high and the profile is unique, we’re seeing these coffees separated from other Sidamos at the ECX.

Ethiopia Natural Sidamo

Guji is one of the zones of the Oromia Region of Southern Ethiopia known for producing some amazing natural coffees. This coffee tends to showcase some nice fruit-forward characteristics with a medium body. In the past, coffees from Guji had been sold in the Sidamo category, but since the quality is high and the profile is unique, we’re seeing these coffees separated from other Sidamos at the ECX.

Guatemala Hue Hue

The Guatemala Huehuetenango EP coffee is prepared for export using a standard called European Preparation (EP), meaning the coffee is hand sorted until there are no more than 8 defects per 300 grams of green coffee. This Guatemalan coffee is sourced from different farms within the region of Huehuetenango and it is known for its clean and bright acidity.

Guatemala Hue Hue

The Guatemala Huehuetenango EP coffee is prepared for export using a standard called European Preparation (EP), meaning the coffee is hand sorted until there are no more than 8 defects per 300 grams of green coffee. This Guatemalan coffee is sourced from different farms within the region of Huehuetenango and it is known for its clean and bright acidity.

Honduras Jaguar

COHORSIL, or La Cooperativa de Horticultores Siguatepeque Limitada was formed in 1980 by a group of 12 vegetable farmers. Their goal was to improve the quality of their produce through transparent administration and achievements to get more producers to adopt the same principles. Prior to the 1980's, the main crops that were being cultivated were vegetables in the nearby mountainous areas, but that had soon changed when the farmers looked to diversify their farms and began growing coffee. Due to the high altitudes of the farms, they found their coffee to have complex attributes. In 1989 the partners of COHORSIL began requiring the cooperative to market their coffee and create a coffee division. The desire of the coffee growers to export their coffee to the international community gave them the edge to maintain and improve the quality of their coffee.

Honduras Jaguar

COHORSIL, or La Cooperativa de Horticultores Siguatepeque Limitada was formed in 1980 by a group of 12 vegetable farmers. Their goal was to improve the quality of their produce through transparent administration and achievements to get more producers to adopt the same principles. Prior to the 1980's, the main crops that were being cultivated were vegetables in the nearby mountainous areas, but that had soon changed when the farmers looked to diversify their farms and began growing coffee. Due to the high altitudes of the farms, they found their coffee to have complex attributes. In 1989 the partners of COHORSIL began requiring the cooperative to market their coffee and create a coffee division. The desire of the coffee growers to export their coffee to the international community gave them the edge to maintain and improve the quality of their coffee.

India Cherry Robusta

This Robusta offering is sourced from the Sakleshpu and Coorg districts in Karnataka, India. Coffee is produced on family-owned farms, many of which have been owned by the same family for generations. The region is extremely biologically diverse, with over 5000 species of flowering plants and 500 species of birds.

India Monsoon Malabar

The origination of Indian Monsoon Malabar coffee dates back to the era when wooden ships loaded with raw coffee beans would take up to 6 months to travel from India to Europe, sailing around the Cape of Good Hope. During the months that the coffee beans were transported at sea, the humidity and ocean winds combined to cause the coffee to change from its fresh green color to a more aged, pale yellow hue. Upon their arrival in Europe, the coffee beans were found to have a unique mellowness, soft and smooth tasting throughout the cup, so that the coffee became an instant hit with Europeans, paving the way for the birth of a new coffee type. Today these conditions are replicated in warehouses during the Indian monsoon season so that the coffee beans, exposed to constant humid conditions, undergo the same characteristic changes in size, texture, appearance and in the cup.

India Monsoon Malabar

The origination of Indian Monsoon Malabar coffee dates back to the era when wooden ships loaded with raw coffee beans would take up to 6 months to travel from India to Europe, sailing around the Cape of Good Hope. During the months that the coffee beans were transported at sea, the humidity and ocean winds combined to cause the coffee to change from its fresh green color to a more aged, pale yellow hue. Upon their arrival in Europe, the coffee beans were found to have a unique mellowness, soft and smooth tasting throughout the cup, so that the coffee became an instant hit with Europeans, paving the way for the birth of a new coffee type. Today these conditions are replicated in warehouses during the Indian monsoon season so that the coffee beans, exposed to constant humid conditions, undergo the same characteristic changes in size, texture, appearance and in the cup.

Mexico Chiapas

The Bella Vista municipality is located deep in the Chiapas region of Mexico, and is the birthplace of Rosalba Cifuentes, the founder of Mayan Harvest. Rosalba founded her organization (which has now grown to 70 producers, 50 of whom are women) to work with coffee producers in the area on improving harvesting and processing their coffee to get more competitive prices. Many of these producers have very little land, so these increased premiums make a significant difference in the producers’ livelihoods. Mayan Harvest also provides medical and dental assistance to its members as well.

Mexico Chiapas

The Bella Vista municipality is located deep in the Chiapas region of Mexico, and is the birthplace of Rosalba Cifuentes, the founder of Mayan Harvest. Rosalba founded her organization (which has now grown to 70 producers, 50 of whom are women) to work with coffee producers in the area on improving harvesting and processing their coffee to get more competitive prices. Many of these producers have very little land, so these increased premiums make a significant difference in the producers’ livelihoods. Mayan Harvest also provides medical and dental assistance to its members as well.

Mexico Huatusco Altura

Nicaraguan

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